On the trail of Kochi’s winged friends – The New Indian Express

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Express Message Service

KOCHI: Kochi has always boasted a rich variety of birds, including migratory and non-migratory species. However, rapid urbanization and climate change have led to the disappearance of many of them, ornithologists say.

To capture Kochi’s bird diversity and also provide insight into how the changing environment is affecting our bird friends, the Cochin Natural History Society (CNHS) plans to conduct a comprehensive survey within company boundaries.

“Although a lot of birding was done, we were never able to cover the city comprehensively. The surveys were limited to some areas like Kadamakudy,” says CNHS Secretary Vishnupriyan Kartha. “The forthcoming survey will track all bird species found in the city.”

Gray-headed Crake

Notably, a recent survey conducted in the district recorded 413 bird species. Interesting sightings included Spoonbill, Lesser Coucal, Black-bellied Plover, Gray-necked Sparrow, Long-billed Pelican, Gadwall, Long-toed Stint, Wryneck, Chinese Pond Heron, Egyptian Vulture, Dusky Warbler, Mongolian Short-toed Lark, Red-billed Tropicbird and Breasted Stint.

A three-year survey is currently planned, which will be supported by the city society. Experts involved in the project say the survey would cover invasive plant species found in bodies of water within city limits.

“The survey will record the presence of birds during the migratory season (January to March) and the non-migratory season (July to September),” says Vishnupriyan. “We will use GPS to track the location of identified birds and the data will be uploaded to an online database called eBird.”

He adds that nature lovers and volunteers would be part of the project. “Although random locations would be selected for recording the bird species, more focus would be placed on areas subject to corporate boundaries,” says Vishnupriyan. “As the survey is planned over three years, we hope to get a clear picture of the state of the bird population, growth and decline.”

KOCHI: Kochi has always boasted a rich variety of birds, including migratory and non-migratory species. However, rapid urbanization and climate change have led to the disappearance of many of them, ornithologists say. To capture Kochi’s bird diversity and also provide insight into how the changing environment is affecting our bird friends, the Cochin Natural History Society (CNHS) plans to conduct a comprehensive survey within company boundaries. “Although a lot of birding was done, we were never able to cover the city comprehensively. The surveys were limited to some areas like Kadamakudy,” says CNHS Secretary Vishnupriyan Kartha. “The forthcoming survey will track all bird species found in the city.” Interesting sightings included Spoonbill, Lesser Coucal, Black-bellied Plover, Gray-necked Sparrow, Long-billed Pelican, Gadwall, Long-toed Stint, Wryneck, Chinese Pond Heron, Egyptian Vulture, Dusky Warbler, Mongolian Short-toed Lark, Red-billed Tropicbird and Breasted Stint. A three-year survey is currently planned, which will be supported by the city society. Experts involved in the project say the survey would cover invasive plant species found in bodies of water within city limits. “The survey will record the presence of birds during the migratory season (January to March) and the non-migratory season (July to September),” says Vishnupriyan. “We will use GPS to track the location of identified birds and the data will be uploaded to an online database called eBird.” He adds that nature lovers and volunteers would be part of the project. “Although random locations would be selected for recording the bird species, more focus would be placed on areas subject to corporate boundaries,” says Vishnupriyan. “As the survey is planned over three years, we hope to get a clear picture of the state of the bird population, growth and decline.”

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